Loretta Lynch to Present Eric Holder with Leadership Award

Loretta Lynch to Present Eric Holder with Leadership Award

The National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) announced that Loretta E. Lynch, United States Attorney General will introduce and present the NOBLE Eric H. Holder, Jr. Award for Leadership in Law Enforcement to its namesake, the Honorable Eric H. Holder, Jr. at the 40th Anniversary Training Conference and Exhibition – Opening Plenary Monday, July 18, 2016 at Marriott Wardman Park.  The Opening Plenary Session will start at 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. EDT.

The annual conference is the year’s largest gathering of international black law enforcement executive’s attorneys, civil and human rights leaders, business leaders, educators, and young people representing the next generation of criminal justice leaders.  More than 2000 people attend the conference annually, offering a wide array of plenaries, professional receptions, forums and technical workshops.

The inaugural Leadership in Law Enforcement award is bestowed upon its namesake Eric H. Holder, Jr. as the first African-American to serve as the nation’s top law enforcement; Mr. Holder used his tenure at the U.S. Department of Justice to stake out strong and laudable positions on the most contested issues of all times.

A native of Queens, New York Holder attended Columbia University where he earned a B.A. in American History in 1973 and received a J.D. from Columbia Law School in 1976. Mr. Holder began his career at the U.S. Justice Department immediately after graduating law school. In 1988, President Ronald Reagan appointed him to serve as a judge on the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. In 1993, President Clinton appointed Holder to serve as Deputy Attorney General under Janet Reno, a position he held until 2001. Holder was in private practice from 2001 until 2007.

President Barack Obama nominated Eric H. Holder, Jr. to be the 82nd United States Attorney General in January 2009 and, following senate confirmation, Holder was sworn in on February 3, 2009 and is the first African-American to hold the post. During his tenure, the U.S. Department of Justice Holder prosecuted many high-profile terrorism cases, secured international partnerships to prevent and combat terrorism, advanced civil rights initiatives to protect the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and same-sex marriage, and promoted criminal justice reform with the Smart on Crime Program, which impacts sentencing. Mr. Holder retired from the Justice Department in 2015 and has been in private practice since.

Loretta E. Lynch is the 83rd Attorney General of the United States. She recently served as United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York from 2010-2015 and from 1999-2001. As U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, Ms. Lynch oversaw federal prosecutions in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and Long Island. On November 8, 2014, President Barack Obama nominated her to succeed Eric Holder as Attorney General. On February 26, 2015, the Judiciary Committee of the United States Senate confirmed her appointment. On April 23, 2015, Ms. Lynch was confirmed by the U.S. Senate and sworn in as Attorney General on April 27, 2015 by Vice President Joe Biden.

About the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives

Since 1976, The National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) has served as the conscience of law enforcement by being committed to justice by action. NOBLE represents over 3,000 members internationally, who are primarily African-American chief executive officers of law enforcement agencies at federal, state, county and municipal levels, other law enforcement administrators, and criminal justice practitioners. For more information, visit www.noblenational.org.

About the Office of United States Attorney General

The Judiciary Act of 1789 created the Office of the Attorney General which evolved over the years into the head of the Department of Justice and chief law enforcement officer of the Federal Government. The Attorney General represents the United States in legal matters generally and gives advice and opinions to the President and to the heads of the executive departments of the Government when so requested. In matters of exceptional gravity or importance the Attorney General appears in person before the Supreme Court. Since the 1870 Act that established the Department of Justice as an executive department of the government of the United States, the Attorney General has guided the world’s largest law office and the central agency for enforcement of federal laws. For more information, visit https://www.justice.gov/.

SOURCE National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives

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